Coronavirus - questions and answers

We’re here to support you and rest assured we’re doing everything we can to keep our services running as smoothly as possible. We also want to help answer some of the questions you may have about the impact of the coronavirus – these fall into three categories as outlined below:

  • Pensions – job retention scheme and pension contributions.
  • Market volatility – the coronavirus outbreak and its effects on the markets.
  • Office closures – affecting all Aegon UK sites from 24 March 2020.

The value of an investment can fall as well as rise and investors could get back less than they originally invested.

Pensions

These questions and answers are based on our understanding of legislation and Government guidance at the date of publication. They mustn’t be distributed to, or relied on by customers. 

No. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has confirmed that the minimum contributions required under automatic enrolment will not be suspended during the coronavirus crisis, although it plans to keep the situation under review as the crisis develops. This means that employers should continue to pay their own and forward their employees’ contributions to their scheme provider in the normal way.

There are special provisions for furloughed employees (that is, those whose employment has been temporarily put on hold). If an employer is claiming for assistance from the Government to cover wages under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, they can claim for 80% of a furloughed employees’ usual monthly wages up to a cap of £2,500 per month. On top of this amount they can claim the associated employer’s National Insurance contributions and 3% of qualifying earnings for minimum auto-enrolment employer pension contributions.

The DWP has confirmed that they anticipate employees will continue to make contributions from their wages (whether they are working normally or on furlough) to help them save for retirement. However, they acknowledge that employees have an option to choose to stop paying although this is likely to result in the cessation of employer contributions too.

Minimum contributions required under automatic enrolment have not been suspended, so employers should continue to pay their own and forward their employees’ contributions to their scheme provider in the normal way. You can find out more in the ‘Have auto-enrolment contributions been suspended?' question above.

The Pensions Act 2008 includes safeguarding rules to protect employees from being taken out of a qualifying pension scheme unless they make that decision for themselves. If an employer takes any action that results in active membership of a qualifying scheme ceasing for a jobholder, the employer has a duty to immediately re-enrol the jobholder back into a qualifying scheme from the day after active membership ceases.

Therefore, an employer should not request a contribution holiday for any of their scheme members, unless they are simply facilitating a request from the employee themselves.

You can read more about the safeguarding rules in The Pensions Regulator’s detailed guidance.

Yes. However, the employer should be aware that:

  • They may need to consult on the change. For more information, see the ‘An employer is reducing its contributions – do they need to consult with their workforce?’ question below and our dedicated FAQ on Consultation by Employers. Any employer considering consultation should seek legal advice, if required.
  • They should review their contractual obligations, as contracts of employment may include a commitment to pay an employer contribution that is higher than 3% of qualifying earnings. Again, employers may wish to seek legal advice on this matter.
  • They should change their payroll to reflect the new basis for calculating contributions, and communicate this to their scheme provider.
  • The change to qualifying earnings should be effective from the start of a pay reference period, so that the minimum contribution for the whole pay reference period can be calculated on the same basis.
  • If using certification*, they should bring their certificate to an end, in line with DWP guidance.

* Certification allows an employer not using qualifying earnings as the basis for calculating minimum contributions to choose from three alternatives. You can find out more in our dedicated FAQ on Certification and the alternative quality requirements.

If the employer is reducing contributions for furloughed employees, The Pensions Regulator (TPR) has confirmed a temporary easement where it won’t take any regulatory action if employers don’t consult for the full 60 days, so long as:

  • The employer has furloughed employees for whom they are making a claim under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.
  • The employer is proposing to reduce the employer contributions for their Defined Contribution scheme in respect of furloughed employees only. For employees not furloughed, the existing pension contribution rate will continue to apply
  • The reduced contribution rate for furloughed employees will only apply during the furlough period, then will revert to the current rate
  • The employer writes to their affected employees and their representatives to describe the intended change and the effects on the scheme and their furloughed employees.

TPR recommends that employers carry out as much consultation as they can. This regulatory easement is due to last until 30 June 2020, but will remain under review. If all of the above criteria are not met, TPR expects employers to comply with the full consultation requirements.

You can read more in TPRs latest guidance on Automatic enrolment and pension contributions: COVID-19 guidance for employers.

Where an employer wants to reduce contributions for employees who are not being furloughed, the normal requirements for consulting will continue to apply, as described below. However, if an employer is facing financial difficulty, which would be exacerbated by the consultation process or length of the consultation period, they can approach TPR to waive or relax any of the consultation requirements. TPR may agree if it is satisfied that it is necessary to do so in order to protect the interests of the scheme members. TPR have not indicated whether the current coronavirus crisis is justification for waiving the normal consultation requirements.

Where the employer has 50 or more employees (not the number of scheme members), they should consult on any reduction in employer contributions. Before the consultation actually starts, the employer must give written information about the proposed change to affected members and to any of their representatives who will be consulted (e.g trade union, elected representatives). Affected members are active or prospective members who would be affected by the change (deferred members and pensioner members do not need to be consulted).

The information provided must:

  • detail the number of prospective and active scheme members upon whom the change will impact
  • describe the proposed change and how it will affect the scheme and its members
  • be accompanied by any relevant background information
  • indicate the timescale over which the change will be introduced
  • allow, in particular, the affected member’s representatives to consider, study and give feedback to the employer of the impact of the change on members

The employer must tell the parties being consulted when the consultation will end, and any deadline for the submission of written comments. The consultation period must last at least 60 days.

The consultation can be regarded as complete if no responses are received by the end of the consultation period.

You can find out more about consultation by employers in our dedicated FAQ, however, any employer who is considering consultation should seek legal advice, if required.

The Pensions Regulator (TPR) has amended some of its rules on reporting late payments from employers to workplace pension schemes to focus on the more serious cases during the coronavirus crisis. It’s important to note there is no change in the employer’s responsibility to pass on both their own and their employees’ contributions to the pension provider on time, as agreed.

Providers and trustees remain responsible for monitoring and challenging late payments but, for a temporary period during the crisis, will have more time and discretion on how to resolve late payments issues. Contributions must always be paid as they are, after all, part of an employee’s reward package, and should not be held on to by employers for other purposes.

Ordinarily late payments are reported using the regulator’s portal once they are 90 days late. This will now be extended to 150 days. There are other rules for persistent late payers and where fraudulent activity is suspected, when reporting happens sooner.

Pension providers will continue to report cases where the employer becomes insolvent, fraudulent activity is suspected, where outstanding contributions are £100,000 and above and where previously unpaid contributions have been resolved.

TPR has a range of enforcement tools at their disposal, but their aim is to educate and support employers in becoming compliant. Under normal circumstances, if an employer is late in complying with their auto-enrolment duties, TPR expects the employer to put their employees in the position they should be in as soon as possible. This means paying the backdated employer contributions and ensuring that the backdated employee contributions are paid as well – either by the employees, or the employer can choose to pay them on behalf of the employees.

However, due to the impact of the coronavirus, TPR have asked scheme providers to look for more flexible processes and arrangements to allow an employer to pay what is due. Arrangements such as payment plans may be appropriate as they will still allow the correct contributions to be paid, but over a longer time. TPR provides more information about non-compliance and their enforcement powers.

No. Employers must not encourage their workers to opt-out or cease active membership of their pension scheme, or go on a contribution holiday, at any time. They would face steep penalties from The Pensions Regulator (TPR) if they did so. You can read more on the penalties TPR can impose on their webpage ‘What happens if I don’t comply?’, and more about safeguarding individuals in TPR’s detailed guidance – see the section on Inducements on page 8.

Some employers may continue to make contributions if a jobholder ceases or reduces their own contributions.

No. The employer duties under the Pensions Act 2008 remain unchanged, so new workers should be assessed as normal and auto-enrolled where required. Employers have the option of deferring assessment of new workers for up to three months under the existing rules (known as ‘postponement’), so this gives some flexibility. The Pensions Regulator has detailed guidance on postponement, if you require further information.

If a jobholder wants to reduce contributions below the minimum required, or stop them altogether, they are effectively ceasing active membership of a qualifying scheme. This means their employer can also stop contributing, although they can continue to contribute if they wish to. If relevant, employees should be made aware of any impact that leaving the pension scheme has on any other Company benefits, such as life assurance benefits.

If the worker wishes to re-start contributions at a later date, and is still classed as a jobholder at that date, they can opt back into the scheme. If they do this and pay the minimum contribution required, the employer is also required to re-start paying minimum contributions. An employer is not obliged to allow the jobholder to opt-in if they have a previous opt-in within the last 12 months, but can if they want to.

The answer to this is unclear at present. Where a jobholder stops contributing, or starts paying less than the minimum required, they are deemed to have ceased active membership of the scheme.

When this happens, their employer is no longer obliged to pay anything. If the employer chooses to continue to pay 3% of qualifying earnings, based on the furloughed wages, it’s not clear if they would be able to claim this back, because there is no requirement under the Pensions Act 2008 for them to pay anything. We’ll update this Q&A once we have clarity on the position.

Employers must not induce their staff to reduce or stop paying contributions. See this question ‘Can an employer ask staff to opt-out, cease active membership or go on a contribution holiday during the coronavirus crisis?' above.

Jobholders can tell their employer that they want to reduce their contribution at any time. If the new level of contribution, once added to the employer’s contribution is less than the total minimum contribution required for the scheme to be a qualifying scheme, the jobholder is deemed to have ceased active membership of the scheme and the employer is no longer obliged to pay its minimum contribution.

If an employer is claiming for assistance from the Government to cover wages under the Job Retention Scheme, they can claim for 80% of a furloughed employees’ usual monthly wages up to a cap of £2,500 per month. On top of this amount they can claim the associated employer’s National Insurance contributions and 3% of qualifying earnings for minimum auto-enrolment employer pension contributions. However, it’s worth noting the following:

  • Claims for employer pension contributions can only be made if the amount claimed is actually paid as an employer contribution.
  • It’s not possible to claim for employer pension contributions of more than the amount actually being paid (for example, if an employer is paying less than the minimum required under automatic enrolment due to the employee choosing to pay less)
  • If a furloughed employee’s salary falls below the lower qualifying earnings threshold (£6,240pa or £520pm for 2020/21), an employer won’t be able to claim any pension contributions from the Job Retention Scheme. This is because 3% of qualifying earnings would be zero as the threshold has not been reached.

Employers who use the Job Retention Scheme can claim for 80% of furloughed employees’ usual monthly wages up to a cap of £2,500 per month. For this calculation, gross salary should be used based on actual salary before tax in the last pay period before 19 March 2020. This can include past overtime, fees and any compulsory commission but excludes dividends, discretionary commission, bonuses, tips, non-cash payments or non-monetary benefits.

Where a salary sacrifice arrangement is in place for a furloughed employee, the post-sacrifice salary that was in payment in the last pay period before 19 March 2020 should be used in the calculation of an employer’s claim under the Job Retention Scheme.

The Job Retention Scheme allows an employer to claim for employer pension contributions of 3% of qualifying earnings based on the furlough salary. Under a salary sacrifice arrangement, an employer is likely to be required to pay pension contributions that are more than this amount for furloughed employees but they can’t claim the excess from the Job Retention Scheme or reduce an employee’s furlough salary to meet the cost of these additional amounts. It’s therefore necessary to check what the contractual position is for pension contributions and relate this to the salary sacrifice arrangement in place. Salary sacrifice arrangements can be based on a percentage of earnings or on set monetary amounts. Additionally, a scheme may calculate pension contributions from the first £1 of earnings or from the lower qualifying earnings threshold and may not include all elements of pay in the calculation.

This means that employers with employees in salary sacrifice arrangements may find that they are obliged to pay employer contributions that exceed the amount that they can claim under the Job Retention scheme.

If pension contributions are calculated as a percentage of pay, then contributions should reduce if an employee’s furlough salary is lower than their normal salary. Where a salary sacrifice arrangement is in place, it’s necessary to do a calculation to work out what pension contributions are due (taking into account the furlough salary and the notional pre-sacrifice salary relating to that) and what can be claimed from the Job Retention Scheme.

If contractual arrangements for furloughed employees state that a set amount will be sacrificed and paid to the pension scheme, then an employer should continue to pay this amount across as part of the employer contribution. This applies even if this amount is greater than the amount due under the pension scheme rules or governing documentation.

Salary sacrifice reworks an employee’s remuneration in a more tax efficient manner at no additional cost to the employee or employer but can help generate higher pension contributions or higher take- home pay as a result. Employers can set up a salary sacrifice arrangement by changing the terms of employment contracts with each employee needing to agree to the change. Contributions made via salary sacrifice may be reviewed each year in line with salary increases. Outside of that if an employee wants to opt in or out of a salary sacrifice arrangement, their contract must be altered with each change. It may be necessary to change the terms of a salary sacrifice arrangement where a life event significantly alters an employee’s financial circumstances and this may include:

  • marriage, divorce or partner becoming redundant or pregnant
  • changes to circumstances directly arising as a result of coronavirus (COVID-19)

For COVID-19, our understanding is that an opt-out could be made by furloughed employees and by employees working normally or on reduced hours or pay who are suffering financial difficulties.

If an employee chooses to opt out of an existing salary sacrifice arrangement, then the pre-sacrifice position is likely to apply. In other words, this may see the (re)introduction of employee contributions alongside employer contributions. It’s also worth pointing out that the claim for wages from the Job Retention Scheme would still be based on the post-sacrifice salary in the last pay period before 19 March 2020.

An employee continuing to work for their employer might want to opt-out of a salary sacrifice arrangement if it means their take-home pay would increase as a result. For furloughed employees, however, opting-out of salary sacrifice may leave them worse off if employee pension contributions start being deducted from their furlough salary (which may need to happen if the scheme is to remain qualifying). Such employees would therefore lose the benefit of the employer paying their contribution through salary sacrifice.

As an alternative to putting employees on furlough, an employer may negotiate reduced pay and/or reduced hours with some or all employees. If this happens, it would be necessary to check what the contractual position is for pension contributions and relate this to the salary sacrifice arrangement in place. Salary sacrifice arrangements can be based on a percentage of earnings or on set monetary amounts. Additionally, a scheme may calculate pension contributions from the first £1 of earnings or from the lower qualifying earnings threshold and may not include all elements of pay in the calculation.

If pension contributions are calculated as a percentage of pay, then contributions should reduce if an employee’s salary is reduced.

If contractual arrangements for employees state that a set amount will be sacrificed and paid to the pension scheme, then an employer should continue to pay this amount across as part of the employer contribution. This applies even if this amount is greater than the amount due under the pension scheme rules or governing documentation.


Market volatility

The global spread of the coronavirus has been an important contributor to the recent volatility in equity (company shares) markets. Markets tend to react to uncertainty, so as new cases arise and the situation evolves, it’s likely that global markets will be impacted further – potentially for a prolonged period of time. This impact could be both positive and negative at different times as market confidence evolves. 

This isn’t something we can determine. It’s important that your employees consider these fund value changes in the context of their long-term investment objectives. Fluctuations in fund value should be expected and, as always, there’s a risk that they may get back less than they invest.

They should speak to a financial adviser in the first instance if they are unsure how the Coronavirus outbreak is impacting their investments, or whether they should take any action. If they don’t have a financial adviser, they can find one on the Money Advice Service website. Please remember that Aegon cannot give financial advice.

Market volatility in the wake of the current coronavirus pandemic has led to increased uncertainty in the UK commercial property market.

This uncertainty has impacted the ability of independent property valuers to accurately assess the value of physical properties. This has resulted in a number of UK commercial property funds being suspended with immediate effect.

This means investors are currently unable to switch out or withdraw money from these funds until such time as the fund manager resumes trading.

Where this affects Aegon insured property funds we’ll contact those affected, their financial advisers, and those responsible for impacted workplace pensions schemes, giving people more detail about what this means for them. 

See the full list of affected funds and more information about these suspensions

These portfolios were already defensively positioned before the coronavirus started to impact markets, because we believed the prospects for most major markets were relatively weak. In line with our long-term investment approach, we’re assessing the impact of recent events on equity and bond markets to ensure that our investment portfolios continue to appropriately balance risk and opportunity. We also remain in dialogue with Morningstar, the asset allocation provider for our Core and Select portfolios, about their views in the context of the sharp market movements. They recommend taking a measured approach to analysing changes to the long-term value of assets. We share this view and stress the importance of investors considering current market volatility in the context of long-term investment objectives.

During recent market falls caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the risk-management process has been triggered, meaning Retiready Solutions 2 to 5, and the MI Savings funds, have de-risked (moved some of their assets into cash). As at 2 April 2020, all the funds include more than 60% in cash or cash equivalents.

The aim of the funds’ de-risking process is to cushion investors from the worst effects of a sharp and sustained fall in markets. However, this doesn’t mean the funds won’t fall in value. The funds de-risk when their volatility reaches a fixed ‘trigger point’, which is higher for the higher-risk funds in the range.

To try to keep the funds within their target volatility ranges, the funds will typically de-risk by around 20% at a time, though the underlying fund provider, BlackRock, has the discretion to increase or decrease this amount depending on circumstances. In this case, the funds have de-risked by over 60% overall.

The fund’s risk management process may mean it misses out on potential growth, particularly if markets bounce back quickly after a fall, or if it de-risks when markets are still growing.

In line with our long-term investment approach, we’re assessing the impact of recent events on equity and bond markets to ensure that our investment portfolios – including our default funds – continue to appropriately balance risk and opportunity. While we can’t predict what markets will do next, we stress the importance of investors considering current market volatility in the context of their long-term investment objectives.

Most default funds reduce exposure to riskier stocks and shares as retirement approaches, with the aim of preparing savings for retirement. This may help to protect those close to retirement from some of the worst of the market falls. However, it may also mean that investors miss out on gains should markets rebound. 

Recent falls in the stock market will mean that, if they’re primarily invested in stocks and shares, they will have seen their pension pot fall in value at a point when they may need to generate an income from those savings.

If they were planning to buy an annuity, they may face additional challenges as the current 0.1% Bank of England Base Rate (correct as of 19 March 2020) has meant that annuity rates have also fallen.

While there’s no guarantee, around if and when fund values and annuity rates will bounce back, they can choose when and how much income they wish to take. If they’re about to retire we’d encourage speaking to a financial adviser about their options. If they don’t have a financial adviser, they can find one on the Money Advice Service website. Please remember that Aegon cannot give financial advice.

There’s a cash facility associated with Aegon Retirement Choices, One Retirement and Aegon Platform accounts. It’s designed to support the management of investments and the payment of charges. It isn’t intended as a long-term savings vehicle. Interest on that account is 0.05% below the Bank of England Base Rate. There isn’t a cash facility associated with other products.

In addition, many of our products also offer cash and near-cash funds.

You can see the range of cash investments available on the fund list relevant to your product:

Please note, there are no cash investments available to direct Retiready investors, although other low-risk investment options are available.  

Aegon remains in a financially solvent and stable position. Business risk and market volatility – including extreme falls like those seen in recent weeks – are things that we plan for as part of our usual business processes. 

Aegon is a well-capitalised, financially stable organisation that has a strong trading history. As a result, our risk of insolvency is very small. However, were this to happen, any investments held with Aegon would be treated in one of two ways, based on their type.

In the highly unlikely event that your employees were to suffer direct loss from Aegon going insolvent, if they’re invested in Aegon insured funds (i.e. funds whose names typically start with ‘Aegon’ or ‘Scottish Equitable’) they would be able to claim under the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). The maximum level of compensation for investments is 100%. This includes insured pensions, annuities and whole of life contracts such as life cover and investment bonds.

If they’re invested in collective investments such as OEICs and unit trusts (including our own LF Aegon OEICs), the assets invested into these funds are held completely separately from Aegon’s own corporate assets and are ring-fenced from them in the unlikely event that Aegon were to become insolvent. The maximum level of compensation for investments is 100% of the amount invested up to a maximum of £85,000. This amount applies per person, per fund manager.

You can find out more about this on the FSCS website.

Aegon is a well-capitalised, profitable business which has been trading strongly.  

Our capital strength is reflected in our A+ ratings from both S&P and Fitch, which demonstrate our position as a financially resilient business.

The Solvency II Directive, issued by the European Union, states solvency capital requirements and aims to coordinate the laws and regulations of EU members as they relate to the insurance industry. Aegon’s capital position is still comfortably above the Solvency II capital requirements. With a diversity of earnings generated from pensions, investments and protection, Aegon has both the business model and financial resources to cope with what could be an extended period of market volatility. We proactively mitigate the impact of market volatility with hedging strategies that protect our revenues.

No material adverse impacts on claims ratios have been observed from the coronavirus at this point, nor has any material credit rating migration been observed.

Aegon UK benefits from being part of a large, diversified international group with significant resources and financial strength. The Aegon Group has revenue-generating investments of €898 billion1 and almost 29 million customers, figures which illustrate our global scale and stability.

1As at 31 December 2019.

Unfortunately the current market uncertainty makes financial scams more likely. It doesn’t matter if contact is made by post, email, text or telephone – they should be increasingly wary of anything pension-related that arrives unexpectedly. The safest thing to do is to hang up the phone, delete the message or ignore the mail. Be careful about using the ‘unsubscribe’ option in emails as this could alert fraudsters that they’ve got the correct contact details. You could remind your employees to consider the following:

Don't:

  • give out personal information if contacted unexpectedly;
  • be rushed into anything, take time to think;
  • sign anything unless you fully understand what you're signing up to, and
  • let anyone into your house unless you’re sure they're genuine.

Do:

  • research any firm that contacts you;
  • check the FCA warning list
  • get yourself regulated financial advice;
  • take your time over financial decisions, and
  • assess the tax implication of any decision you make.


Office closure

Yes, all Aegon offices are currently closed in line with government coronavirus guidance. Aegon staff have been asked to work from home at this time.

The closure of our offices was something we anticipated, and we have detailed plans in place to minimise the impact on our customers while ensuring our employees remain as safe as possible.

Most of our services will be unaffected by the office closure. Our phone lines remain open however we are operating reduced hours from 10am-4pm, Monday-Friday.

Please go to the contact us page to see alternative ways of contacting us.

Please be reassured that we're prioritising key tasks such as ensuring we make payments out to customers and investing monies sent to us. There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

While the offices are closed it may take longer than usual for us to get back to you. We ask for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience this may cause. 

We’re responding to email queries 8:30am – 5:30pm Monday to Friday. Our phone lines remain open however we are operating reduced hours from 10am-4pm, Monday to Friday.

You can access our website and online services 24/7. Please visit our contact us page to see the best ways of getting in touch.

Our offices will reopen when government guidance allows this, and on condition that there are no additional local factors that make it sensible to keep one or more of our offices closed for longer.

We’ve implemented business continuity plans so we can continue to serve your employees, and we will prioritise critical requests at busy times.

Please note that while phone lines remain open, we are operating reduced hours from 10am-4pm, Monday-Friday.

All online services are operating as normal and we’re dealing with enquiries and transaction instructions online. You can find more about how to contact us online.

We’ll respond as quickly as we can, but wait times may be longer than usual while our offices are closed. We ask for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience this may cause. To help manage demand, we’ll prioritise the most critical activities (such as deposits, withdrawals and investment instructions).

There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

You can contact us online or by telephone.

Please note that while phone lines remain open, we are operating reduced hours from 10am-4pm, Monday-Friday.

While our offices are closed, it may take longer than usual for us to get back to you. We ask for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.

There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

We’ll continue to post updates to our dedicated coronavirus website and we’re doing everything we can to maintain our service to you.

We’re doing everything we can to maintain our service to you, and the best way to get in touch in the current circumstances is by using our online forms.

You can find out how to do this on the contact us page of our website.

Please be reassured that we're prioritising key tasks such as ensuring we make payments out to customers and investing monies sent to us. There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

You can continue to do business with us online, and all critical services will continue to operate. Our phone lines remain open however we are operating reduced hours from 10am-4pm, Monday-Friday.

You can find more about how to contact us online.

Please be reassured that we're prioritising key tasks such as ensuring we make payments out to customers and investing monies sent to us. There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

We’ve stopped all business travel to comply with UK government guidelines. Where possible, we’re rescheduling meetings to take place via teleconferencing over platforms such as Skype. Our relationship management teams are still available to support employers, trustees and advisers, and should be your first point of contact if you have any enquiries. 

We’re prioritising customer queries so that we respond to the most urgent first, and we’re working hard to minimise the impact on you. While the offices are closed it may take longer than usual for us to get back to you. We ask for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.

There's no need to send us a reminder of your request – we'll be in touch shortly.

Detailed instructions on how to do this can be found on the contact us page of our website. 

Where we outsource a service, we ensure that the appropriate business continuity planning is in place with our partners in the event of an Aegon, or third party, interruption. This is detailed in our business continuity plan, which is aligned to both Business Continuity Institute Good Practice and the Aegon Group requirements.